Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/106
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dc.contributor.authorKimball, Thomas D.-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-01T19:13:38Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-01T19:13:38Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citation61 Loy. L. Rev. 365en_US
dc.identifier.issn0192-9720-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/106-
dc.description.abstract"[M]isunderstandingsand neglect occasion more mischief in the world than even malice and wickedness. At all events, the two latter are of less frequent occurrence."In November of 2006, the residents of Michigan went to the voting booths faced with a proposal to amend their constitution to ban the use of racial-preferences in state university admissions processes. The ballot proposal (Proposal 2) passed with roughly fifty-eight percent voting in favor of the proposal. After its passage, Proposal 2 became Article I, Section 26 of the Michigan Constitution (Section 26),4 which in pertinent part provides:en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLoyola University New Orleans College of Lawen_US
dc.subjectSchuette v. BAMNen_US
dc.subjectFederalismen_US
dc.titleSchuette v. BAMN: The Short-Lived Return of the Ghost of Federalism Pasten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
Appears in Collections:Law Review

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