Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/97
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dc.contributor.authorBunnell, Randall John-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-01T18:52:28Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-01T18:52:28Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citation63 Loy. L. Rev. 77en_US
dc.identifier.issn0192-9720-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/97-
dc.description.abstractProving pretext is the crux of virtually every employment- discrimination case brought under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act: an act intended to discourage discrimination in the workplace and provide a remedy for those subject to this hurtful, heinous conduct. The effectiveness of this remedy has, however, been hamstrung by a judiciary that is often unwilling to give proper credence to evidence offered by employees attempting to prove pretext at the summary-judgment stage. The result has been the pre-trial disposal of the vast majority of employment discrimination claims.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLoyola University New Orleans College of Lawen_US
dc.subjectSummary Judgmenten_US
dc.subjectTolan v. Cottonen_US
dc.titleSummary Judgment Principles in Light of Tolan v. Cotton: Employment Discrimination Implications in the Fifth Circuiten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
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