DSpace Repository

WHY DOES JUSTICE THOMAS HATE THE COMMERCE CLAUSE?

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author McGoldrick, James M. Jr.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-03-03T21:50:17Z
dc.date.available 2020-03-03T21:50:17Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation 65 Loy. L. Rev. 329 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0192-9720
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/131
dc.description.abstract As reflected in the introductory quotes, there are two faces to the Commerce Clause, and Justice Thomas hates them both. First, the Commerce Clause is one of the most important grants of power to Congress in the Constitution, which Thomas criticizes as “Congress appropriating state police powers.” Second, the very grant of power to Congress imposes limits on the ability of state and local governments to regulate interstate commerce. This is called the negative or Dormant Commerce Clause, which Justice Thomas says “has no basis in the text of the Constitution, makes little sense” and is “virtually unworkable.” To put it bluntly, Justice Thomas really, really hates the Commerce Clause. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Loyola University New Orleans College of Law en_US
dc.subject commerce en_US
dc.subject thomas en_US
dc.title WHY DOES JUSTICE THOMAS HATE THE COMMERCE CLAUSE? en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account